The Best of Exponential: Volume 2 Digital Access Pass features 10+ videos from leaders like Andy Stanley, Danielle Strickland, and Ray Johnston.

Andy Stanley (2018) – The practice of multiplication thinking is a shift from thinking ministry happens through my own leadership to thinking ministry happens through multiplied leaders. This is a shift in thinking, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “Think it!” You move from thinking that the best way to maximize ministry is through your own efforts to understanding that it is through developing the leadership of others. We see this in the life of Jesus in Acts 1:8. When Jesus casts a vision for taking the gospel to the ends of the earth, he tells his followers, “You will be my witnesses,” to explain that he is going to do it through them. Jesus didn’t think the mission was going to happen just though him during his time on this earth; he thought it would happen through others who would equip others who would equip still others. Jesus practiced multiplication thinking.

Danielle Strickland (2018) – The practice of kingdom building is a shift from counting the people who show up at my thing to counting the leaders who go out and do God’s thing. This is a shift in counting, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “Count it!” You are no longer only concerned with who is showing up at your thing; you count who is doing God’s thing! Jesus told his followers in simple terms, “Seek first the kingdom of God” (Matthew 6:33 ESV). They heeded this admonition, and all that mattered was what God was keeping track of as the Jesus mission was being advanced around the world.

Eric Mason (2017) – Big dreams make us more dependent on God and drive us to our knees. If you don’t have a dream that causes you to be dependent on God, then you need to get a bigger dream! A movement-making church is not possible on our own. When we embrace Jesus’ big dream of Level 5 multiplying church we will quickly come to the realization that it will only happen through the power of God. This realization will drive us to our knees asking God to accomplish through us what only he can do; knowing we can not do this on our own.

Shaun Marshall (2018) – The practice of disciple multiplying is a shift from sharing what I’ve learned to add followers to sharing what I’ve learned in ways that multiply disciples to the fourth generation. This is a shift in sharing, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “Share it!” You will begin to not only share what you know to help others follow Jesus but also share your life and invest in the development of leaders who do the same for other leaders. We see this in the life of Jesus as he spent three years primarily with twelve people (John 3:22).

Ray Johnston (2018) – The practice of gift activating is a shift from asking God to bless the use of my own gifts to asking God to bless leaders whom I am sending out. This is a shift in blessing, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “Bless it!” You will not just ask God to bless the gifts he has given you but ask him to bless the leaders you have developed as you send them out at the end of their apprenticeship. The most obvious example of this is in Matthew 28:16-20; Jesus is turning over the leadership of the movement to his closest followers, and he tells them, in effect, “I have all authority and will use it through you as you go!”

Jossy Chacko (2018) – The practice of disciple multiplying is a shift from sharing what I’ve learned to add followers to sharing what I’ve learned in ways that multiply disciples to the fourth generation. This is a shift in sharing, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “Share it!” You will begin to not only share what you know to help others follow Jesus but also share your life and invest in the development of leaders who do the same for other leaders. We see this in the life of Jesus as he spent three years primarily with twelve people (John 3:22).

David Garrison (2016) – Once you resolve the tension of motives (Session 2), you will continually face the tension of measurement: Will you be only about growing your church or will you also be about sending? Tension of Measurement deals less with “what do we want to do?” and more with “what are we doing?” This is an ongoing struggle for the life of a church between GROWING vs SENDING. Level 5 churches are focused on sending as much as growing. We will never see a level 5 movement-making church in the United States until we are as passionate about sending as we are growing.

Bryan Loritts (2018) – The practice of kingdom building is a shift from counting the people who show up at my thing to counting the leaders who go out and do God’s thing. This is a shift in counting, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “Count it!” You are no longer only concerned with who is showing up at your thing; you count who is doing God’s thing! Jesus told his followers in simple terms, “Seek first the kingdom of God” (Matthew 6:33 ESV). They heeded this admonition, and all that mattered was what God was keeping track of as the Jesus mission was being advanced around the world.

Nancy Ortberg (2018) – The practice of permission giving is a shift from seeing what God can do through my own leadership to seeing what God can do through other leaders. This is a shift in seeing, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “See it!” You will take the focus off your leadership and begin to see the leadership potential in the people all around you. Since you see the people around you as leaders in development, you will begin to lead with a yes and give them permission to fully engage in the mission. We see this in the life of Jesus when he says to a group of ragtag working-class fellows, “Come, follow me.” (Matthew 4:19) They never expected a rabbi to see them worth teaching and leading. But Jesus saw in them a group that could change the world.

Dave Ferguson, Candace Lewis, Michael McBride, Mark DeYmaz, Greg Surratt (2015) – Forum Conversation Engaging Healthy Conversations on Race Relations

James Choung (2018) – The practice of multiplication thinking is a shift from thinking ministry happens through my own leadership to thinking ministry happens through multiplied leaders. This is a shift in thinking, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “Think it!” You move from thinking that the best way to maximize ministry is through your own efforts to understanding that it is through developing the leadership of others. We see this in the life of Jesus in Acts 1:8. When Jesus casts a vision for taking the gospel to the ends of the earth, he tells his followers, “You will be my witnesses,” to explain that he is going to do it through them. Jesus didn’t think the mission was going to happen just though him during his time on this earth; he thought it would happen through others who would equip others who would equip still others. Jesus practiced multiplication thinking.

Noemi Chavez (2018) – The practice of gift activating is a shift from asking God to bless the use of my own gifts to asking God to bless leaders whom I am sending out. This is a shift in blessing, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “Bless it!” You will not just ask God to bless the gifts he has given you but ask him to bless the leaders you have developed as you send them out at the end of their apprenticeship. The most obvious example of this is in Matthew 28:16-20; Jesus is turning over the leadership of the movement to his closest followers, and he tells them, in effect, “I have all authority and will use it through you as you go!”

Devin Turner (2018)– The practice of disciple multiplying is a shift from sharing what I’ve learned to add followers to sharing what I’ve learned in ways that multiply disciples to the fourth generation. This is a shift in sharing, and if you want a quick slogan for this practice, it’s “Share it!” You will begin to not only share what you know to help others follow Jesus but also share your life and invest in the development of leaders who do the same for other leaders. We see this in the life of Jesus as he spent three years primarily with twelve people (John 3:22).